What Is Child Support Used For?

What Can I Use Child Support Payments For?

Clients often ask whether there are any limitations to what a custodial parent can use child support payments for. The truth is, child support can be spent on nearly anything. There are no federal laws that limit the use of child support payments. Most state laws do not place limitations on use, either. Nevertheless, most non-custodial parents need some assurance that the payments they make are being used for their child’s needs. This article will provide some information on how child support payments should be used and how payments are often determined.

Child Support Payments Should be used for Basic Needs

Typically, it is expected that child support payments will be used to pay for food, clothing, and housing. Of course, the cost of raising children involves much more than that. For instance, there are usually school expenses, extracurricular activity fees, and toys. Older children, especially teenagers, can have costs associated with cars, like gas and auto insurance. Since child support payments are generally calculated to cover all of a child’s portion of household expenses, a custodial parent has the discretion to spend the additional money on extra items or expenses.

Child Support Based on Parents’ Income

In a very general sense, child support is meant to ensure that children of divorced or separated parents will continue to live as comfortably as they would have had their parents stayed together. States typically calculate child support payments by combining both parents’ income, and setting aside a percentage of the total amount for the needs of the child. The law will assume that the custodial parent pays for food, clothing and shelter directly, as that parent buys the groceries for the home and makes housing payments. Thus, the non-custodial parent contributes by making cash support payments to the custodial parent.

What is a Child Support Add-On?

In addition to the basics (food, clothing and shelter) and typical school and extracurricular expenses, children also need healthcare and medical insurance. Also, child care is a common expense, as the custodial parent often has to work outside the home. Therefore many courts add a percentage of these additional costs, after calculating basic child support, to this basic child support amount. Some states, though not all, also include extracurricular or educational costs in the child support add-on.

If you have questions regarding child support, or any other family law issues, contact attorney Brad J. Latta online, or by calling (251) 304-3200.

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